NCOIS at the Evidence and Implementation Summit 2021

NCOIS will take part in the Evidence and Implementation Summit 2021, with many of our team presenting their implementation-focused research.  The EIS Summit 2021 aims to bring together evidence, implementation, policy, and politics, with the theme of ‘Towards a better future for all’ and is a leading sector event for evidence and implementation globally.

This year, the Summit will be held online, enabling a wide network of global contributors, to be live streamed over two days,
30th March – 31st March 2021. The event will be co-hosted by Monash University and the Centre for Evidence and Implementation. For further information and the full program, visit the website: www.eisummit.org.

NCOIS PRESENTERS:

Dr Nicole Nathan
Research Fellow
University of Newcastle

Presentation: Increasing schools’ implementation of a mandatory physical activity policy: Outcomes of a cluster RCT

Objectives of study presented:
Many jurisdictions have policies that stipulate the number of daily or weekly minutes of physical activity (PA) that schools are required to schedule. Unfortunately, the implementation of such policies is less than optimal. The potential public health benefits that may result from these policies requires population-wide implementation. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a multi-strategy implementation intervention on increasing teachers’ implementation and maintenance of a mandatory PA policy.

Contact Nicole at: nicole.nathan@newcastle.edu.au and Twitter

 

Ms Courtney Barnes
Phd Candidate
University Of Newcastle

Presentation 1: Feasibility of a web-based intervention to improve the implementation of nutrition practices in childcare
Objectives of study presented:
Systematic review evidence is needed to identify effective approaches and opportunities to enhance future research. To date, there has been no synthesis of the impact of obesity prevention intervention studies for children attending family day care services. Therefore, this study aims to i) identify and synthesise findings from interventions to improve the dietary intake, physical activity and weight status of children aged 0-6 years attending family day care services; and ii) assess the impact of interventions on family day care environments, intervention cost and adverse outcomes.

Presentation 2: Improving the implementation of school-based healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices: a review
Objectives of study presented:
The primary aim of this review was to examine the effectiveness of strategies that aim to improve the implementation of school‐based policies, practices or programmes to address child diet, physical activity, or obesity. The most recent systematic review of strategies to improve implementation of healthy eating and physical activity interventions in schools was published in the Cochrane Library in 2017. As the field of implementation science is rapidly evolving and a number of studies have been since published, an update of the review was required to reflect the current evidence-base.

Contact Courtney at: Courtney.Barnes@health.nsw.gov.au and Twitter

Ms Melanie Lum
Phd Candidate
University Of Newcastle

Presentation 1: Interventions to improve diet, physical activity and weight status of children in family day care.
Objectives of study presented:  Systematic review evidence is needed to identify effective approaches and opportunities to enhance future research. To date, there has been no synthesis of the impact of obesity prevention intervention studies for children attending family day care services. Therefore, this study aims to i) identify and synthesise findings from interventions to improve the dietary intake, physical activity and weight status of children aged 0-6 years attending family day care services; and ii) assess the impact of interventions on family day care environments, intervention cost and adverse outcomes.

Presentation 2: Implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in family day care.
Objectives of study presented:  Much of the implementation research in childcare has focussed on centre-based services. Comparatively, there has been limited research conducted in the family day care setting, which operates with fewer children, individual educators and adaptable opening hours. This study aimed to examine the i) prevalence of implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices among schemes and educators in the family day care setting in Australia; and ii) associations between educator socio-demographic characteristics and implementation of healthy eating and physical activity practices.

Contact Melanie at: melanie.lum@newcastle.edu.au and Twitter

 

Dr Alice Grady
Research Fellow
The University Of Newcastle

Presentation: Three-Arm RCT of High and Low-Intensity Implementation Strategies to Support Nutrition Guideline Implementation in Childcare
Objectives of study presented:
In health and community settings where resource constraints are a common barrier to the conduct of large-scale, methodologically rigorous implementation research, the strategic use of three-arm RCT designs allow for study findings to be generated more rapidly as multiple interventions can be tested concurrently, and facilitate the optimising of resources associated with conducting RCTs. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of a suite of implementation strategies of varying intensities (high v low v usual are control) on childcare service overall menu, and individual food group, compliance with nutrition guidelines at 12-month follow-up.
Contact Alice at: alice.grady@newcastle.edu.au and Twitter

 

Dr Rebecca Hodder
NHMRC Early Career Research Fellow
The University Of Newcastle / Hunter New England Population Health

Presentation 1: Effectiveness of interventions to increase pre-schooler fruit and vegetable intake: a living systematic review
Objectives of study presented:
To describe the methods, results and lessons learned from an ongoing Cochrane living systematic review assessing the effectiveness of interventions to increase fruit or vegetable consumption of children aged five years and under.

Presentation 2: Identifying effective school-based practices to prevent obesity in children
Objectives of study presented:
To conduct a systematic review to determine the effectiveness of interventions targeting diet, physical activity or both in reducing obesity in children aged 6-18 years. Additionally, the study aimed to conduct subgroup analyses of school-based interventions on the basis of intervention components to determine the effectiveness of individual ‘practices’ to provide policy makers with evidence for multicomponent school-based obesity prevention programs.

Contact Rebecca at: rebecca.hodder@newcastle.edu.au and Twitter

Mr Adam Shoesmith
Phd Student
University Of Newcastle

Presentation: Factors associated with primary schools’ sustained implementation of a state-wide physical activity policy
Objectives of study presented:
To assist schools in delivering sustained class-based physical activity in line with current policy requirements, it is important to understand the barriers and facilitators impacting on their long-term compliance with the current policy. This study aimed to: 1) use a validated sustainability-specific tool to identify the factors (barriers and facilitators) associated with teacher’s sustained delivery of physical activity across the school week; and 2) determine teacher’s preferred support strategies designed to assist them in continuing to implement the current physical activity policy.

Poster: Shoesmith, A.*, Hall, A.*, Shelton, RC., Powell, BJ., Wolfenden, L.*, Sutherland, R.*, Yoong, S.*, Lane, C.*, Nathan, N*. Factors influencing the sustainability of public health interventions in educational settings: a systematic review. Evidence and Implementation Summit, Australia (online) 2021.

Contact Adam at:  adam.shoesmith@newcastle.edu.au and Twitter

Mr Matthew Mclaughlin
PhD Candidate
University Of Newcastle

Presentation: Scaling-up and Changing Delivery-mode: A Mixed-methods Process Evaluation of the Physical-Activity-4-Everyone (PA4E1) Program Website

Objectives of study presented: Following adaptation for scale-up, a website was introduced as a delivery mode of implementation support strategies to support secondary schools to implement a physical activity program. Adaptation for scale often involves both changes to implementation support strategy delivery mode and a concurrent ‘voltage drop’ in effect size. To understand how the delivery mode is used, the aim of this study is to understand the usability of, and engagement with, this website to support teachers to implement the PA4E1 school physical activity program practices.
Contact Matthew at: matthew.mclaughlin@uon.edu.au and Twitter

Ms Cassandra Lane
Phd Candidate
University Of Newcastle

Presentation 1: Preparing a school-based physical activity intervention for scale-up using a process of optimisation
Objectives of study presented:
The implementation of school-based physical activity policies mandated by many jurisdictions internationally is poor. Thus, the potential benefits of such policies are seldom realised. We developed an intervention that increased schools’ compliance with a mandatory physical activity policy. Although effective, this intervention is resource-intensive and may not be amenable for delivery at-scale. The aim of this paper is to describe how we used a process of optimisation (an iterative, data-driven method of rapid intervention improvement) to facilitate the successful scale-up of this intervention.

Presentation 2: A systematic review of the adaptations and effectiveness associated with scaling-up evidence-based physical activity interventions
Objectives of study presented:
The ‘scale-up’ of effective physical activity interventions is required if they are to yield improvements in population health and reduced burden of disease. Adaptations are common in the scale-up process and may support the broader dissemination of interventions. For example, they might assist to improve intervention fit within diverse contexts. There are many benefits to adaptation processes for delivering interventions at-scale, however adaptations can also have a detrimental impact on the effects of interventions. This study aimed to systematically review adaptations made to physical activity interventions scaled-up in community settings and any impact scale-up had on effect size.

Contact Cassandra at: Cassandra.Lane1@health.nsw.gov.au and Twitter